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Global Research Partners

Under the JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) Program for Advancing Strategic International Networks to Accelerate the Circulation of Talented Researchers, world-wide top class researchers are conducting collaborative research with NITech.

Professor for the Brain Circulation Project: Edward I. Solomon

Edward I. Solomon
Name
(Laboratory Website)
Prof. Edward I. Solomon
University Stanford University
Countries & Regions The United States

Edward I. Solomon is the Monroe E. Spaght Professor of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Photon Science at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Prior to this, he was a Professor at M.I.T. and a Postdoc at the Ørsted Institute in Copenhagen and the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are Inorganic, Physical, Biophysical, Bioinorganic and Theoretical-Inorganic Chemistry emphasizing the application of a wide variety of spectroscopic and computational methods to determine the electronic structure of transition metal complexes and their contribution to physical properties and reactivity. Since 2014, he has been an invited researcher at Hideki Masuda’s laboratory on the field of dioxygen activation, dinitrogen reduction, and dioxygen evolution.

Professor for the Brain Circulation Project: Wonwoo Nam

Wonwoo Nam
Name
(Laboratory Website)
Distinguished Prof. Wonwoo Nam
University Ewha Womans University
Countries & Regions Republic of Korea

He is a Distinguished Professor and Director of Center for Biomimetic Systems, Department of Chemistry and Nano Science of Ewha Womans University. He obtained his B.S. in Chemistry from California State University, Los Angeles and Ph.D. from University of California, Los Angeles. His research areas are Bioinorganic chemistry; Biomimetic studies of heme and nonheme iron monooxygenase enzymes; Understanding the roles of metal ions in biological systems; Biomimetic oxidation reactions; Mechanisms of O2 activation and formation.
Since 2014, he has been an invited researcher at Hideki Masuda’s laboratory on the field of dioxygen activation, dinitrogen reduction, and dioxygen evolution.

Professor for the Brain Circulation Project: Michael Fryzuk

Michael Fryzuk
Name
(Laboratory Website)
Prof. Michael Fryzuk
University The University of British Columbia
Countries & Regions Canada

Dr. Fryzuk is Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry at the University of British Columbia.
He obtained his B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Toronto. After a National Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology, he accepted an assistant professor position at UBC in 1979. He has received a number of awards including Fellowships in the Chemical Institute of Canada and in the Royal Society of Canada, as well as an E. W. R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship. Most recently, he was awarded the 2011 Killam Award for Excellence in Mentoring.
His research themes are small molecule activation, ligand design, coordination chemistry, homogeneous catalysis, and transition metal chemistry.
Since 2014, he has been an invited researcher at Hideki Masuda’s laboratory on the field of dinitrogen activation and dinitrogen reduction.

Professor for the Brain Circulation Project: Karsten Mayer

Karsten Meyer
Name
(Laboratory Website)
Prof. Karsten Meyer
University Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen Nuremberg
Countries & Regions Germany

Karsten Meyer is a Professor of Chemistry, Chair of Inorganic & General Chemistry at the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) in Germany. The inorganic chemistry in the Meyer laboratory bridges the field of classical coordination chemistry with fields of supramolecular, organometallic, and bioinorganic chemistry. The general research focuses on the organic synthesis of ionic liquids and ionic liquid crystals as well as the synthesis of new chelating ligands and their transition and actinide metal coordination complexes for small molecule activation and transformation chemistry.
In general, the research in the Meyer laboratory allows for learning a variety of inorganic and organic synthetic techniques as well as the theory and application of a large number of spectroscopic and computational methods.
Since 2014, he has been an invited researcher at Hideki Masuda’s laboratory on the field of dinitrogen activation.

Professor for the Brain Circulation Project: Joachim Heberle

Joachim Heberle
Name
(Laboratory Website)
Prof. Joachim Heberle
University Institute of Experimental Physics
Freie Universität Berlin
Countries & Regions Germany

He is a Professor at the Department of Physics of the Freie Universität Berlin.
His research interests are in the structure and function of membrane proteins and in the methodologies to investigate those. In 2008-2011, he has been a member of the Study Section in Chemistry of the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft). Since May 2015, he has been an Associate Editor of Chemical Reviews.
Since 2014, he has been an invited researcher at Hideki Masuda’s laboratory on the field of dinitrogen reduction (application for fuel cell).

Professor for the Brain Circulation Project: Jaeheung Cho

Jaeheung Cho
Name
(Laboratory Website)
Assistant Prof. Jaeheung Cho,
University Department of Emerging Materials Science
Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology (DGIST)
Countries & Regions Republic of Korea

He is an assistant professor of the Department of Emerging Materials Science of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology (DGIST).
His research interests are dioxygen activation and nitrogen oxide sensing.
Since 2014, he has been an invited researcher at Hideki Masuda’s laboratory on the field of dioxygen activation, dinitrogen reduction, and dioxygen evolution.

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