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Home > Topics > A research paper released by the YAMAMURA-MIYAGAWA Lab was published in the International Journal of Biological Macromolecules

A research paper released by the YAMAMURA-MIYAGAWA Lab was published in the International Journal of Biological Macromolecules

Category:News|Publishing : July 8, 2024


YAMAMURA-MIYAGAWA Laboratory's research paper titled "Preparation of β-1,3-glucan mimics via modification of polymer backbone, and evaluation of cytokine production using the polymer library in immune activation," was published in the International Journal of Biological Macromolecules (Vol. 264, 130546, 2024; Impact Factor=8.2). The authors are Associate Professor MIYAGAWA Atsushi (NITech Life Science and Applied Chemistry Group), YAMAMOTO Nami (student in the Master's course, at the time), OHNO Ayane (student in the Master's course, at the time), and Professor YAMAMURA Hatsuo (NITech Life Science and Applied Chemistry Group).

In this study, the researchers successfully developed molecules that exhibit strong cytokine induction, significantly surpassing the immunostimulating activity of natural β-glucan, by chemically synthesizing branched oligosaccharides as the repeating structures of β-glucan and polymerizing them using norbornene. By reconstructing β-glucan via the polymerization of the oligosaccharides and modifying the resulting polymers, the team created a library of β-glucan mimic polymers with diverse backbone structures. The structural elements essential for β-glucan-like immune activation was then identified through structure-activity relationship studies. The resultant artificial polymers have the potential to activate the immune system and induce anti-tumor activity. Through effective use of the biological activity of β-glucan, the polymers are expected to lead to broad applications in the development of safe anti-tumor and antiviral agents.

Link to International Journal of Biological Macromolecules

Preparation of β-1,3-glucan mimics via modification of polymer backbone, and evaluation of cytokine production using the polymer library in immune activation - ScienceDirect


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